The best way to learn about the PBL process is to do a scenario with your students... and we`ll work with you to make sure it`s a memorable success!

10 Steps to Conducting a Great PBL Scenario

Participating in a well-organized PBL Scenario is something that students will remember for the rest of their lives.  We`ll help you every step of the way to make your PBL a memorable event (for all of the right reasons!)

 

                                                      

Before we get started:

This is a good time to have a painless session with teachers to review the fundamentals of Problem-Based Learning and highlight what you’re trying to accomplish with this PBL.

 
 

 

 

 
   Now let`s begin:
 
 

1)  Choose the PBL Scenario… your options are limitless, but that can also seem intimidating!

 
     
 

2)  Send a letter and an invitation home to parents (this will help set the mood with the students that this is an important event)

 
     
 

3)  Introduce the PBL to your students.  Go over the topic, lay out the expectations, and explain the final task (the “product”).  This is where it all begins!

 
     
 

4)  Review the “Stimulus Items”.  These are any articles, videos, statistics, infographics, and so on that provide the necessary background information.

                                                 

  

 

 

 

   
 

5)  Engage in classroom discussion.  Your students have gathered the information by this point, so they should have some interesting things to say (of course, your skills as a mediator are important with this step).

     
 

6)  Have your students complete “thought gathering” sheets.  This is where they can take all of the information they’ve absorbed, choose a position, and prepare to respond.

 
     
 

7)  Students are now ready for the “product.”  They will work in teams and strengthen their collaboration and communication skills (AKA “21st Century Skills”).  Perhaps they are designing a new invention, or pitching an idea to investors, or arguing a position to a town council.

 
     
 

8)  The Great Reveal!  Parents will come to the school in the culmination of the PBL scenario.  This isn’t just a “show what I’ve been doing in school” affair.  This is an event where students come with a purpose and ready to WOW parents with their ideas and creations.

 
     
 

9)  The grading process is often dreaded (both for the student AND teacher).  Still, students need to have that feedback to grow and improve!  PBLs can be tricky to grade because it`s a combination of content, 21st century skills, and real-world decision making.  But we’ll work  with you through this entire process!

 
     
  10)  The Feedback!  There`s a great sense of accomplishment when it’s all over.  Take some time to soak in!  Ask students to identify what the challenges were, what they learned, and how the entire process can be better for next time!  

 

Interested?  Please contact:

Ben Bache, Manager of the PBL Project
ben@pblproject.com
(864)-877-5123